Home Entertainment Science AMA Series: Beef without cows, sushi without fish, and milk without animals. We’re cellular agriculture scientists, non-profit leaders, and entrepreneurs. AMA!

Science AMA Series: Beef without cows, sushi without fish, and milk without animals. We’re cellular agriculture scientists, non-profit leaders, and entrepreneurs. AMA!

14 min read
61
0
24
AliDropship is the best solution for drop shipping

We’ve gathered the foremost experts in the burgeoning field of cellular agriculture to answer your questions. Although unconventional, we’ve chosen to include leaders from cell ag non-profits (who fund and support researchers) as well as representatives from cutting edge cell ag companies (who both do research and aim to produce commercial products).

Given the massive cultural and economic disruption potential it made sense to also include experts with a more holistic view of the field than individual researchers. So while you’re encouraged to ask details on the science, feel free to also field questions about where this small, but growing industry and field of study is going as a whole.

 

**For a quick primer on what cellular agriculture is, and what it can do, check this out**: http://www.new-harvest.org/cellular_agriculture

If you’d like to learn more about each participant, there are links next to their names describing themselves, their work, or their organization. Additionally, there may be a short bio located at the bottom of the post.

 

In alphabetical order, our /r/science cellular agriculture AMA participants are:

**Andrew Stout** is a New Harvest fellow at Tufts, focused on scaling cell expansion in-situ via ECM controls.

**Erin Kim** [1](http://www.new-harvest.org) is Communications Director at New Harvest, a 501(c)(3) funding open academic research in cellular agriculture.

**Jess Krieger** [1](http://www.new-harvest.org/cultured_meat_at_kent_state_university) [2](https://www.linkedin.com/in/jess-krieger-068640aa/) is a PhD student and New Harvest research fellow growing pork, blood vessels, and designing bioreactors.

**Kate Krueger** [1](http://www.new-harvest.org) is a biochemist and Research Director at New Harvest.

**Kevin Yuen** Director of Communications (North America) at the Cellular Agriculture Society (CAS) and just finished the first collaborative cell-ag thesis at MIT.

**Kristopher Gasteratos** [1](https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/33839952/Nature__The_Neomnivore_DASH_Submission.pdf?sequence=1) [2](http://www.cellag.org) [3](https://scholar.harvard.edu/kristophergasteratos) is the Founder & President of the Cellular Agriculture Society (CAS).

**Dr. Liz Specht** [1](http://www.gfi.org/) Senior Scientist with The Good Food Institute spurring plant-based/clean meat innovation.

**Mike Selden** [1](https://www.facebook.com/finlessfoods/videos/1928029480558900/) is the CEO and co-founder of Finless Foods, a cellular agriculture company focusing on seafood.

**Natalie Rubio** [1](https://www.linkedin.com/in/natalierrubio/) [2](http://www.new-harvest.org) is a PhD candidate at Tufts University with a research focus on scaffold development for cultured meat.

**Saam Shahrokhi** [1](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GgP6jo5DTM) [2](https://www.eatjust.com/en-us/stories/clean-meat) [3](https://www.CellAg.org) Co-founder and Tissue Engineering Specialist of the Cellular Agriculture Society, researcher at Hampton Creek focusing on scaffolds and bioreactors, recent UC Berkeley graduate in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science.

**Santiago Campuzano** [1](http://www.new-harvest.org) is an MSc student and New Harvest research fellow focused on developing low cost, animal-free scaffold.

**Yuki Hanyu** is the founder of Shojinmeat Project a DIY-bio cellular agriculture movement in Japan, and also the CEO of Integriculture Inc.

Bios:

Andrew Stout

^(Andrew became interested in cell ag in 2011, after reading a New York Times article on Mark Post’s hamburger plans. Since then, he has worked on culturing both meat and gelatin—the former with Dr. Post in Maastricht, NL, and the latter with Geltor, a startup based in San Francisco. Andrew is currently a New Harvest fellow, pursuing a PhD in Dr. David Kaplan’s lab at Tufts University. For his research, Andrew plans to focus on scalable, scaffold-mediated muscle progenitor cell expansion. Andrew holds a BS in Materials Science from Rice University.)

 

Erin Kim

^(Erin has been working in cellular agriculture since 2014. As Communications Director for) [^New ^Harvest](http://www.new-harvest.org)^(, Erin works directly with the New Harvest Research Fellows and provides information and updates on the progress of their cellular agriculture research to donors, industry, the media, and the public. Prior to her role at New Harvest, Erin completed a J.D. in Environmental Law and got her start in the non-profit world working in legal advocacy.)

 

Jess Krieger

^(Jess dedicated her life to in vitro meat research in 2010 after learning about the significant contribution of animal agriculture to climate change. Jess uses a tissue engineering strategy to grow pork containing vasculature and designs bioreactor systems that can support the growth of cultured meat. She was awarded a fellowship with New Harvest to complete her research in the summer of 2017 and is pursuing a PhD in biomedical sciences at Kent State University in Ohio. She has a B.S. in biology and a B.A. in psychology.)

 

Kristopher Gasteratos

^(Kristopher Gasteratos is the Founder & President of the Cellular Agriculture Society) ^( (CAS))^(, which is set for a worldwide release next month launching 15 programs for those interested to) [^join ^and ^get ^involved](http://www.cellag.org)^(. He conducted the first market research on cellular agriculture in 2015, as well as the first) [^environmental ^analysis ^of ^cell-ag ^in ^August ^2017] (https://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/33839952/Nature__The_Neomnivore_DASH_Submission.pdf?sequence=1)^.

 

Liz Specht, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, The Good Food Institute

^(Liz Specht is a Senior Scientist with the Good Food Institute, a nonprofit organization advancing plant-based and clean meat food technology. She has a bachelor’s in chemical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, a doctorate in biological sciences from UC San Diego, and postdoctoral research experience from University of Colorado. At GFI, she works with researchers, funding agencies, entrepreneurs, and venture capital firms to prioritize work that advances plant-based and clean meat research.)

 

Saam Shahrokhi

^(Saam Shahrokhi became passionate about cellular agriculture during his first year of undergrad, when he learned about the detrimental environmental, resource management, and ethical issues associated with traditional animal agriculture. The positive implications of commercializing cellular agricultural products, particularly cultured/clean meat resonated strongly with his utilitarian, philosophical views. He studied Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at UC Berkeley, where co-founded the Cellular Agriculture Society, and he conducted breast cancer research at UCSF. Saam is now a researcher at Hampton Creek focusing on scaffolds and bioreactors for the production of clean meat.)

 

Santiago Campuzano

^(Santiago Campuzano holds a BSc in Food science from the University of British Columbia. As a New Harvest research fellow and MSc student under Dr. Andrew Pelling, he wishes to apply his food science knowledge towards the development of plant based scaffold with meat-like characteristics.)

 

Yuki Hanyu

^(Yuki Hanyu is the founder of Shojinmeat Project a DIY-bio cellular agriculture movement in Japan, and also the CEO of Integriculture Inc., the first startup to come out of Shojinmeat Project.
Shojinmeat Project aims to bring down the cost of cellular agriculture to the level children can try one for summer science project and make it accessible to everyone, while Integriculture Inc. works on industrial scaling.)

AliDropship is the best solution for drop shipping
Load More Related Articles
Load More By plugeldadmin
Load More In Entertainment

61 Comments

  1. Doomhammer458

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Science AMAs are posted early to give readers a chance to ask questions and vote on the questions of others before the AMA starts.

    Guests of /r/science have volunteered to answer questions; please treat them with due respect. Comment rules will be strictly enforced, and uncivil or rude behavior will result in a loss of privileges in /r/science.

    If you have scientific expertise, please verify this with our moderators by getting your account flaired with the appropriate title. Instructions for obtaining flair are here: [reddit Science Flair Instructions](http://www.reddit.com/r/science/wiki/flair) (Flair is automatically synced with /r/EverythingScience as well.)

    Reply

  2. petertmcqueeny

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Does cell ag have applications beyond food products? I.e. could you grow a functional human liver/hear/lung for transplant?

    That also makes me wonder…could you grow human muscle tissue, and if so would eating it be cannibalism?

    Reply

  3. Tanagashi

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    As a huge meat lover, I am excitingly looking forward to artificially grown meat to hit the market.

    1. What would you say are the greatest challenges in creating a product that tastes close to the real thing? I’ve heard things about the texture being wrong due to the fact that grown tissue is not the same as the animal that gets some exercise.
    2. How scalable are current methods of meat growth? Is it something that can be done on industrial scale?

    Reply

  4. 96385

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Even lab grown meat doesn’t just grow out of nothing. What types of raw materials are needed and where do they come from? Are the resources already available? Would the conversion farmland of required to feed livestock be enough to provide the raw materials for the world’s lab-grown meat supply?

    Reply

  5. taushet

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What is likely to be the first type (white fish, dark fish, red meat, poultry, etc) of synthetic meat to be indistinguishable from animal meat? Are there any specific meat types that have specific challenges unlikely to be overcome soon?

    Reply

  6. Eunile

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What are the biggest limits to making cellular agriculture affordable?

    Reply

  7. DnDYetti

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Is there a particular food type (e.g. beef, fish, etc) that has proven to be more complicated to accurately create, or that you all think may be more difficult to create? If so, is there any particular reason for this?

    Reply

  8. MeatBallsdeep

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I’m going to assume that nutritionally it is nearbouts identical to the animal. How does it compare in taste?

    Reply

  9. SeaMenOnTheRocks

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Many cuts of meat are useful for making specific dishes – such as ribs, or how different areas of the cow have different fat content and marbling. Do specific cuts of meat have a place in the future of cellular agriculture, or just lump meats?

    Reply

  10. mabillin

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What are some of the “ethical” backlashes you’ve seen from people who say it’s “not natural”?

    Reply

  11. kombatk

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    As an adult, I have developed several serious food allergies. We know now that it’s not only the protein in foods that can cause allergic reactions but researchers aren’t sure exactly what the trigger is for some people. Do you have any worries that these technologies can cause more allergies for people? Or is there hope that they could help decrease the incidences of reactions?

    Reply

  12. Captchca_ca_KA

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hello, I’m curious about the size of the individual samples of meat/fish grown. Will the labs of the future grow a portion-sized chunk of meat/fish, or will it grow a huge slab of meat/fish and chop it up into portion sizes once it’s grown?

    Reply

  13. gardenfey

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    My burning question is when will this be available commercially, if you had to give a rough estimate?

    Reply

  14. hungryhippo2013

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Is there anyone working on growing meat in micro gravity for space travel? How far away do you all think we are from seeing lab meat in a grocery store and/or leather made in the lab?

    Reply

  15. SwampWTFox

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Best guess: How long do you think it will take before lab grown food is the norm, and makes up the majority of animal protein that we buy at the supermarket?

    Reply

  16. HungryEdward

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Is all meat grown in the “likeness” of existing animal meats? Has there been considerations towards growing a whole new, “original”, meat product; superior in taste, smell, etc – or are there dangers involved with that?

    Reply

  17. Uberg33k

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Is there a way that this process could be replicated on a smaller scale by an individual or small company. While helping animal welfare is great, I worry this might add another nail in the coffin of small and family farms. I’m not really excited about the idea of the entire food chain being in the hands of a few conglomerates. If this process could be adapted for the small guys to be able to compete, that helps competition and spurs a more diverse food supply chain. Thoughts?

    Reply

  18. roqueofspades

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    First of all, I’d like to thank you for doing this work, as both a meat lover and an animal lover who is transitioning to vegetarian. I am grateful that someday I will be able to actually eat meat again.
    As for my question, do you think it will be possible to someday emulate the structure of the meat as well as the cells? iirc, so far artificially grown beef has only been shown in ground beef because you can only recreate the cells, not the structure, correct me if I’m wrong. Will I someday be able to eat an artificially grown skirt steak instead of just meatballs?

    Reply

  19. Sirgeeeo

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    How do you keep it from being just another unhealthy processed food once it’s in the hands of corporations?

    Reply

  20. Variant_Zero

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Should this truly be the future of how we get our food, how do you think this will impact the animal populations? What then becomes the purpose of cow and chickens?

    Second question. How long before people start messing with the cellular properties of the products and start creating cheef(that’s what I imagine a chicken/beef hybrid would be called) or maybe blueberry bacon, or saltless bacon, or lean protein that resembles/tastes like prime rib.

    Reply

  21. el_dave00

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I’m curious about the energy usage….how much electricity per kilogram of synthetic product is required? How many kilowatt-hours of power, for instance, would be required to sustain a moonbase population of 100 people for a year?

    Brilliant and disconcerting concept?

    Reply

  22. aClimateScientist

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I’m curious to hear your thoughts about the “clean meat” approach versus the “meatless meat” approach (such as the [“Impossible Burger”](https://www.cloverfoodlab.com/2017/09/21/introducing-impossible-burger/), which my roommate recently tried and said tasted more like a burger than most actual burgers). My impression is that vegetable-based products will always be cheaper and require less water / energy than meat-based products. Thoughts?

    Reply

  23. abgonzo7588

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I do not know much about lab grown meat but I find the idea very interesting as I’m a chef by trade. My question is, will we have the ability to grow specific cuts like brisket and beef ribs or will it just be more of a ground beef product? If so will they be able to get to the point of being marbled like a cut of wagyu and if so do you see it increasing the overall quality of beef available?

    Reply

  24. shadywhere

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    If I understand the process correctly, cells are transfected so that they produce the protein of interest. How is the protein collected so that the culture medium is not retained?

    Reply

  25. Reoh

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Can you grow the next batch from donations of the last?

    Or will you require some livestock to server as donors, and if so what samples are harvested from them?

    Reply

  26. ChangingHats

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    How much interest have big fast food operations shown in this endeavour? Have any of them provided funds to support lab-grown meat? Basically, when can I expect McD’s to start selling lab-grown beef patties?

    Reply

  27. thistangleofthorns

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    This may be a dumb question, feel free to ignore:

    First, emulating meat products as a way to wean society off of the unhealthy, cruel and environmentally catastrophic real thing will be a fantastic accomplishment, like you people are literally saving the world and everyone on it!

    Here’s my dumb question: Are you guys also inventing new foods, not an emulation of anything, just some great new thing(s) with a unique taste, texture and properties of their own?

    I guess I’m asking because as a vegan who has come to find eating fake meat to be… weird, I’m really interested in trying other foods besides all the vegetables (which I love!) and the fake meats and fake cheeses, etc. Just that it would be cool to have NEW NEW things to try.

    Hope that made sense, thanks for the work you’re doing, and thanks for doing this AMA!

    Reply

  28. JimmyCrackCrack

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What are the barriers to getting this to work? What are the known unknowns that have prevented artificial meat from being viable so far? Also, if not for the need to make something commercially viable, could you make a perfectly recreated steak fairly easily? To what extent is the challenge of making something that can be done relatively practically and economically a burden on the research?

    Reply

  29. Serious_Senator

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hi guys and gals! Thanks for answering our questions today. In your field, what inspires you? What technical or social changes are you afraid of?

    Reply

  30. TBones0072

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Those are some impressive bios, congratulations to all of you on your successes.

    “Milk without cows” as someone who is lactose intolerant these words are music to my ears. How can this help people like me with food/dairy allergies? Will it be lactose free, or I’m curious what kind of options will be available. Almond milk is a fine substitute but it’s not cows milk which I sometimes crave.

    Reply

  31. worfox2

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Can you grow lab meat without hurting animals? I know that fewer animals would get killed, but can it get done without keeping animals in perpetuity?

    Reply

  32. KingTutenkhamen

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What are the health risks compared to real meat and milk?

    Reply

  33. veryfascinating

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    From what I understand, cell culture requires the use of FBS which makes it not animal-free. While there are substitutes out there that claim to be animal free, they are not as efficient or unsuitable for the intricate and sensitive process that is growing mammalian cells in vitro. How then are you going to overcome this and yet be able to produce lab grown meat efficiently at an economically viable scale?

    In other words, as a researcher who does cell culture everyday as a career, I am not convinced that lab grown meat can truly be animal free. Can you convince me otherwise?

    Reply

  34. Headbangert

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I have a health question. Since the meat is grown can you control the trans-fat content in the product? Is it possible to enrich the meat with vitamins for example b12? Second part of the question. what are your ressources? Is the meat free of agricultural chemicals like fungicides? Are there hormones involved in the process and therefore in the finished product? Edit: To sum it up is your meat healthier than regular meat.

    Reply

  35. insomniaddict91

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I am interested in sustainable agriculture. Traditional farming uses more water and land than any other industry, and has had a huge impact on natural ecosystems globally. Can cellular agriculture use significantly less resources to provide a similar product?

    Reply

  36. Bo_Buoy_Bandito_Bu

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hi! Thank you for doing this. I have 2 questions.

    From my understanding, current lab grown meat and bioreactor set ups require the use of calf fetal serum. What is the progress getting away from this as a requirement? I suspect the industrial production of sufficient calf serum will pose its own ethical issues.

    Secondly, how much carry over is there between the advancing technology behind lab grown meat and the growth of artificial or new human organs?

    Reply

  37. drsjsmith

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Were any of you at all inspired to enter the field of cellular agriculture by science fiction, such as Chicken Little in Pohl and Kornbluth’s *The Space Merchants*?

    Reply

  38. PHealthy

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hi and thanks for joining us!

    When can I expect a customized transplant pig heart or liver?

    Where are we in terms of bio-fuel from cell ag?

    Reply

  39. EscobarMendez

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    The good thing about animals is that they convert grass or grain into meat. What do you grow your meat on? Do you think growing meat could become more efficient than the current farms and slaughterhouses?

    edit: Can you make dinosaurs?

    Reply

  40. Hmluker

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I absolutely believe this is the future and that we are in the very beginning stages of this. So tell me.. where should I invest my money?

    Reply

  41. naemissa

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    As someone who loves dairy products and has been thinking about going vegan for a long time I’m super stoked to see this AMA!!

    My question is pretty much what you suggested: where do you see this field of study going in the next 5-10 years? What are the next frontiers and the most pressing issues to tackle?

    Reply

  42. sleepalldayeveryday

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    If I was interested in pursuing this as a career, what graduate degree would best prepare me?

    Reply

  43. Khaji_Dha

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Would it be possible for this technology to stop hunting and poaching if you could do this to animals like sharks, tigers, rhinos and ect.

    Reply

  44. maniana123

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What measures would your organization take, to prevent cultured cells production from becoming monopoly

    Reply

  45. lucaxx85

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hi there. I’m going to ask you a holistic question on the field as a whole, since you suggested it.

    What is the intended use case for cellular agriculture? What is your ultimate objective and how do you think it would work in the society?

    Western societies eat more meat than ever in history and it’s so cheap it doesn’t even make sense. Also, many people, including me, are moving away from processed food and paying a premium price to eat locally grown food from responsible farms (even if I don’t buy “full” organic, as I think it’s unscientific). How would cellular agriculture products fit into this consumer preferences shift?

    For background, in europe you can get ground **beef** for prices lower than 5€/kg!!!! Such a low price doesn’t even make sense. From a policy perspective it would make sense to try to make meat production more difficult, so that prices could rise back to levels when families ate beef once a week.
    I’m poor, I decided to buy exclusively unprocessed locally produced food. And I still can afford much more food and meat than it would be healthy!!

    Reply

  46. bwylie7215

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    For something that is just being developed, how can we know for sure lab grown meat is safe to consume? Just like with cigarettes when they first hit the market nobody knew what they were smoking was literally killing them, until decades later. How can we be sure that 10 or 20 years down the line lab grown meat, wont have the same negative connotation that cigarettes do now?

    Reply

  47. GoOtterGo

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hey folks,

    Often lab meat is marketed as ‘clean meat’, in that it’s toted as avoiding all the animal welfare and environmental concerns that come with traditional livestock sourcing. But judging by your responses thus far livestock is still very much involved in the production of current lab meat types, if not on just a smaller less industrial scale.

    That being said, do you feel ‘clean meat’ is perhaps a misnomer? Or is the current state of lab meat not necessarily reflective of the desired end-state of your research? Is it at all a goal that lab meat is derived completely without animal involvement? Or is that a false assumption by many?

    Reply

  48. PsionyxV2

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    While there seems to be an awful lot of concern stemming ones own personal views on meat consumption and the ethics behind it, I think an important question is how long before this technology becomes available to underdeveloped countries? I watched a documentary about the consumption of bushmeat in Africa. For many people this is their only consistent source of protein. This technology could change not only their lives but could save the lives of Jungle residents (including Monkeys)

    Reply

  49. martishot

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What is your biggest motivation, as an organization and as individuals, to bring these types of products to market? Thanks!

    Reply

  50. MountainNine

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Lab-grown foods sound like the next really, really big food movement. Very exciting! Like any large change, I’d like to hear the flip side: what gets lost – nutritionally, probiotically, etc. – when food is grown “artificially?”

    What are the projected or predicted long-term health effects on a human body that consistently consumes foods which did not have to express multiple genes to survive and thrive in the wild, but were rather cultivated in ideal growth conditions?

    We’re running into an increasing nutrition and natural probiotic deficit problem now already with farmed foods bred for yield, which contain a narrowing gamut of nutrients and inherent friendly bacteria. How would lab-grown foods overcome this?

    Thanks for your time!

    Reply

  51. glubins189

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Love the work you are doing guys! Been keeping an eye on this tech for a while now and the innovation continues to impress me. I have two questions.
    1. Obviously the positive environmental impact is a huge advantage of your work, but what about economic impact? I imagine of course methane emissions going down are only going to help an economy due hopefully a diminished effect of climate change and health issues caused by Methane from livestock, but will they outweigh the negatives on jobs maintained through animal agriculture and farming?

    and no 2. **How can we all help?** I’d like to donate to you guys! (and if you know of a group in my country (Australia) that is helping you guys at all?)

    Reply

  52. carbomite2

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Since nobody else is asking the obvious:

    Can you please give dates for when “clean meat” will be CHEAPER than the cheapest farmed meat for each type (beef, pork, chicken, turkey, salmon, tuna, shrimp, etc, etc.).

    Unless it’s actually *cheaper*, it will remain a niche market competing with Boca burgers for a relative handful of vegan dollars.

    Reply

  53. Jswissmoi

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    How does someone get involved in the field?

    Reply

  54. Yamochao

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    1. Are there any studies in the social sciences you could point to which attempt to determine how receptive the general population would me to switching? I know cost and moral righteousness would be compelling to many consumers, but what else do you think can be done to shift the general population towards animal free meat?

    2. Who are the biggest political forces in the meat industry currently? Is there any evidence of these major players anticipating the threat to their business or preemptively adapting to the trend? What political/economic/PR strategies can we expect them to employ to preserve the status quo?

    Reply

  55. PropgandaNZ

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    What are the biggest hurdles in large scale production?

    Reply

  56. Samrodetrip

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    I’ve always heard eating a variety of vegetables gives you more benefits (micronutrients and whatnot) than just sticking to a few. Has anyone thought about this for meat? If you grow beef forever from one good starter cow, and I eat only that as my meat for decades, is it worse than eating from many different real cows over time?

    Reply

  57. GranFabio

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Hello to everyone and thank you for all the exciting work!

    I’m a freshly graduated MSc in Medical, Molecular and Cellular Biotechnology that despite coming from a slightly differend field really believes that sustainability in meat production will be a milestone from both an environmental and an ethical point of view.

    I’d really be happy to give my contribution in this field: have you any suggestion about companies/institutions where I can apply for a research position/PhD as a young scientist?

    Talking about companies, are the big food producers already interested in the research or are they waiting until the technology is more mature? Do you think we’ll see a future where the traditional food companies will switch to the new techs or do you expect new companies to grow and become important players in the market?

    Thanks for your attention and best wishes for your work!

    Reply

  58. Montgomery0

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Protein is uninteresting without fat. Fat provides a great deal of flavor and mouth feel. What are the prospects of “growing” fat alongside protein for a fuller, richer experience?

    Reply

  59. dinoman260

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    The work you do so is fascinating! I’m really interested to know your biggest concerns, if any, to when/if this goes commercial

    Reply

  60. Reinoud-

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

    Next to animal cruelty etc, one of the biggest problems that I know of with the animal industry is its inefficiency. Don’t pin me down on the exact numbers, but I believe that in order to produce 1 kilogram of beef you need north of 20 kilogram of organic matter. These ratios are different for chicken, fish and dairy products, but all these products are very inefficient.

    Instead of producing beef, it would be much more efficient to produce 20 kg of organic matter suitable for humans to eat instead (i.e. vegetables etc).

    Would cellular agriculture be (much) more efficient, if these processes are developed into industrial scale?

    Can we, the population of the entire Earth, feed everybody without widespread veganism?

    Reply

  61. Anonymous

    September 30, 2017 at 1:57 am

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

My new desk art. Boss wasn’t pleased.

My new desk art. Boss wasn’t pleased. …